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Association of Black Cardiologists' "We Are The Faces" campaign unveils new videos for Black Maternal Health Week


In celebration of Black Maternal Health Week (April 11-17, 2024) and April's Minority Health Month, the Association of Black Cardiologists (ABC) is proud to unveil a new slate of videos as part of its third year of the "We Are The Faces of Black Maternal Health" awareness and advocacy campaign.


This new collection of videos features excerpts from powerful patient narratives interwoven with insights from leading ABC member clinicians across diverse specialities. This series amplifies the intergenerational impact of the Black maternal health crisis and underscores the critical role of healthcare professionals in addressing racial disparities in maternal health outcomes.


Recent findings continue to show that Black women are disproportionately impacted by maternal morbidity and mortality. These disparities extend to other women of colour as well, highlighting the need for comprehensive action to ensure equitable access to quality care for all.


"Decades of headlines emphasise the urgent need for a multi-faceted approach that addresses the systemic and institutional factors exacerbating the disparity gap in Black maternal and cardiovascular health," states ABC President Dr. Anekwe Onwuanyi. "ABC remains committed to raising awareness, fostering collaboration and finding solutions to advance the health and wellbeing of Black women and their families."


ABC members are uniquely positioned to address the maternal health crisis, given the intersection of maternal health and cardiovascular well-being. Standing at the "crossroads" of being patients, relatives of patients, healthcare professionals treating these patients, or all of the aforementioned, gives them a distinct perspective and opportunity to drive meaningful change on this issue.


"It is so important to recognise that we all have a role to play in mitigating this epidemic that negatively affects the Black family," said Rachel M Bond, MD, Co-chair of the Cardiovascular Disease in Women and Children Committee for ABC. "An essential aspect of the campaign draws attention to the vital role Black men play - whether as spouses or relatives - in their support of Black women by advocating to ensure the mother's concerns are heard and addressed, but this support also includes prioritising their own cardiovascular health before, during, and after the pregnancy."


"As a pediatric cardiologist, I recognise the profound impact of maternal health on the well-being of families, especially Black families," states Annette K Ansong, MD, Co-Chair of the Cardiovascular Disease in Women and Children Committee for ABC. "We must work collaboratively with our colleagues in primary care, obstetrics, and cardiology to advocate for integrated strategies that prioritise the health of mothers and babies. After all, Black women are first Black girls, and by promoting heart-healthy habits from childhood, we can help pave the way for healthier pregnancies."


Individuals are invited to visit WeAreTheFaces.ABCardio.org to watch the videos, download patient and clinician infographic resources, share their stories, and learn more about maternal health disparities. Together, we can effect tangible change and rewrite the narrative on Black maternal health.


About ABC

Founded in 1974, the Association of Black Cardiologists, Inc. (ABC) is a nonprofit with a global membership exceeding 2,000 individuals, including health professionals, community health advocates, and corporate and institutional members. The ABC remains dedicated to its mission of promoting heart health and wellness in minority communities. Today, by fostering public and private partnerships and advocating for equitable access to care, ABC continues to make strides in improving cardiovascular outcomes for all.


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